Resources

This is a fairly exhaustive list of books, chapters and articles covering Amanita muscaria, as well as a few decent web resources. Some are speculative at best (Wasson, Rush, Heinrich, etc.), but still worth reading if you’re interested in the subject, if only to learn more about the crazy theories out there. 

As to procuring your own Amanita muscaria, of course foraging for them personally is always best, but if you don’t live in the right climate, they can be found online in several places, my favorite being iamshaman.com.

AMANITA BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • Ahlberg-Venezia, A.J. “Raven’s Bread.” Idunna 58 (2003): 28-33.
  • Allegro, John. The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross: A study of the nature and origins of Christianity within the fertility cults of the ancient Near East. New York: Doubleday & Co, 1970.
  • Atkinson, Terry. Sacred Mushroom/Holy Grail: The Long-lost Origin of Our Most Intriguing Legend. Portland, OR: Jorvik Press, 2013.
  • Benjamin, Denis R. “Amanita muscaria – An Entrepreneurial Opportunity (A Modern Satire).” Fungi 4.1 (2011): 22.
  • Benjamin, Denis R. “Inebriation or Pantherine Syndrome.” In Mushrooms: Poisons and Panaceas. W.H. Freeman & Company, 1995.
  • Benjamin, D.R. “Mushroom poisoning in infants and children: the Amanita pantherina/muscaria group.” Journal of Toxicology and Clinical Toxicology 30.1 (1992):13-22.
  • Beug, Michael and Marilyn Shaw. “Animal Poisoning by Amanita pantherina and Amanita muscaria: A Commentary.” McIlvainea 18.1 (2009): 37-39.
  • Bourke, John G. “Poisonous Mushrooms Used in Ur-Orgies.” In Scatalogic Rites of All Nations. Washington, D.C.: W.H. Lowdermilk & Co.,1891.
  • Brough, John. “Soma and Amanita muscaria.” Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London 34.2 (1971): 331-362.
  • Crundwell, E. “The Unnatural History of the Fly Agaric.” Mycologist 1.4 (1987): 178-181.
  • Czigany, L.G. “The Use of Hallucinogens and the Shamanistic Tradition of the Finno-Ugrian People.” Seer 58.2 (1980), 212-217.
  • de Rios, Marlene Dobkin. “The Reindeer Herdsmen of Siberia.” In Hallucinogens: Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1984.
  • Dunn, Ethel. “Russian Use of Amanita muscaria: A Footnote to Wasson’s Soma.” Current Anthropology 14.4 (1973): 488-492.
  • Erowid.org. “Psychoactive Amanitas.”
  • Failla, Nicklas B. The Origins of Religion: A Dissertation upon the Divine Manna of the Ancient Jews, the Eucharist of the Catholic Church, and the Blood and Body of Christ, as reference to Sacred Mushrooms. Lulu.com, 2015.
  • Geml, J., et al. “Beringian Origins and Cryptic Speciation Events in the Fly Agaric (Amanita muscaria).” Molecular Ecology 15 (2006): 225-239.
  • Hawkeswood, Trevor. “A record of Amanita muscaria (L.) Lam. (Basidiomycetes: Amanitaceae) from Wentworth Falls, New South Wales, Australia with a review of some literature on the ecology of the species within Australia.” Calodema 7 (2006): 29-31.
  • Heinrich, Clark. Magic Mushrooms in Religion and Alchemy. Rochester, VT: Park Street Press, 2002.
  • Jay, Mike. “Mushrooms in Wonderland.”
  • Laurie, Erynn Rowan and Timothy White. “Speckled Snake, Brother of Birch: Amanita Muscaria Motifs in Celtic Legends.” Shaman’s Drum 44 (1997).
  • Lee, Earl. From the Bodies of the Gods: Psychoactive Plants and the Cults of the Dead. Rochester, VT: Park Street Press, 2012.
  • Letcher, Andy. Shroom: A Cultural History of the Magic Mushroom. Ecco, 2007.
  • Lincoff, Gary. “Is the Fly-Agaric (Amanita Muscaria) an Effective Medicinal Mushroom?” presented at The Third International Medicinal Mushroom Conference, Port Townsend, Washington, 2005.
  • Lowy, B. “Amanita muscaria and the Thunderbolt Legend in Guatemala and Mexico.” Mycologia 66.1 (1974): 188-191.
  • Maestas, Silence. “The Little Red Man.”
  • Marley, Greg A. “Amanita Muscaria: Soma, Religion, and Santa.” In Chanterelle Dreams, Amanita Nightmares. White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green Publishing Company, 2010.
  • Michelot, Didier and Leda Maria Melendez-Howell. “Amanita muscaria: chemistry, biology, toxicology and ethnomycology.” Mycological Research 107.2 (2003): 131-146.
  • Morgan, Adrian. Toads and Toadstools: The Natural History, Mythology and Cultural Oddities of This Strange Association. Berkeley, CA: Celestial Arts Publishing, 1995.
  • Ott, Jonathan. “Psycho-Mycological Studies of Amanita: From Ancient Sacrament to Modern Phobia.” Journal of Psychedelic Drugs 8.1 (1976): 27-35.
  • Piomelli, Daniele. “One route to religious ecstasy (Amanita muscaria).” Nature 349 (1991): 362.
  • Puharich, Andrija. The Sacred Mushroom: Key to the Door of Eternity. Doubleday & Co., 1959.
  • Rätsch, Christian and Müller-Ebeling, Claudia. Pagan Christmas: The Plants, Spirits and Rituals at the Origins of Yuletide. Inner Traditions, 2006.
  • Robinson, Richard. “First Record of Amanita muscaria in Western Australia.” Australasian Mycologist 29 (2010): 4-6.
  • Rogers, Robert. “Amanita muscaria.” In The Fungal Pharmacy: The Complete Guide to Medicinal Mushrooms & Lichens of North America. Berkley, CA: North Atlantic Books, 2011.
  • Rubel, William and David Arora. “A Study of Cultural Bias in Field Guide Determinations of Mushroom Edibility Using the Iconic Mushroom, Amanita muscaria, as an Example.” Economic Botany 62.3 (2008): 223-243.
  • Rubel, William. “How much Amanita muscaria is safe to eat?
  • Ruck, Carl A. P. “The Offerings from the Hyperboreans.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology 8 (1983): 177-207.
  • Rush, John. The Mushroom in Christian Art. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books, 2011.
  • Saar, Maret. “Ethnomyocological data from Siberia and North-East Asia on the effect of Amanita muscaria.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology 31.2 (1991): 157-173.
  • Saar, Maret. “Fungi in Khanty folk medicine.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology 31.2 (1991): 175-179.
  • Satora, Leszek, et al. “Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) poisoning, case report and review.” Toxicon 45 (2005): 941-943.
  • Salzman, E., et al.  “In Search of Mukhomor, the Mushroom of Immortality.” Shaman’s Drum 41 (1996): 36-47.
  • Schultes, Richard Evans and Albert Hofmann. “Mainstay of the Heavens: Amanita (Fly Agaric).” In Plants of the Gods: Their Sacred, Healing and Hallucinogenic Powers. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1992.
  • Teeter, Donald E. Amanita Muscaria: Herb of Immortality. Manor, TX: Ambrosia Society, 2005.
  • Tsujikawa, Kenji, et al. “Analysis of hallucinogenic constituents in Amanita mushrooms circulated in Japan.” Forensic Science International 164 (2006): 172-178.
  • Tupalska-Wilczynska, K. “Poisoning with spotted and red mushrooms–pathogenesis, symptoms, treatment.” Wiadomosci lekarskie 49.1-6 (1996): 66-71.
  • Urkachen, Tatiana (Tungus shaman). “Tatiana Explains the Mushrooms.” (video)
  • Viess, Debbie. “Further Reflections on Amanita muscaria as an Edible Species.Mushroom: The Journal of Wild Mushrooming 
  • Wasson, Robert Gordon. Soma: Divine Mushroom of Immortality. Harcourt, 1972.
  • Wasson, R. Gordon. “Ethnomycology: Discoveries About Amanita muscaria Point to Fresh Perspectives.” In Ethnobotany: Evolution of a Discipline, eds. Richard Evans Schultes and Siri Von Reis. Portland, OR: Dioscorides Press, 1995.
  • Wasson, R. Gordon. “Traditional Use in North America of Amanita muscaria for Divinatory Purposes.” Journal of Psychedelic Drugs 1.2 (1979): 25-28.
  • Wasson, Valentina Pavlovna and R. Gordon Wasson. Mushrooms: Russia and History. New York: Pantheon Books, 1957.
  • Whelan, Christal. “Amanita muscaria: The Gorgeous Mushroom.” Asian Folklore Studies 53.1 (1994): 163-167.
  • Wiget, Andrew and Olga Balalaeva. “Khanty Communal Reindeer Sacrifice: Belief, Subsistence and Cultural Persistence in Contemporary Siberia.” Arctic Anthropology 38.1 (2001): 82-99.
  • Yurchak, Alexei. “A Parasite from Outer Space: How Sergei Kurekhin Proved That Lenin Was a Mushroom.” Slavic Review 70.2 (2011): 307-333.